Ask the Perfumer Nov. 10, 2013

by | Nov 10, 2013 | Anya's Garden Perfumes, natural perfume, Perfume From Your Garden book | 4 comments

Roses, and other nourishing flowers, make a lovely facial vinegar

Roses, and other nourishing flowers, make a lovely facial vinegar

I’ll be here until 10 PM tonight to answer any perfumery questions, and in the meantime, here’s a bit from the Facebook page for my upcoming book Perfume From Your Garden:

Perfume From Your Garden will not be limited to fresh plant material from the garden: I love to tincture and infuse dried rose buds. Their scent is beautiful, and they can be used in perfumes, room and linen sprays (tinctures) and many other products, including facial vinegars.

If you’d like to join in the chat on the Facebook group, you can join here. I don’t answer perfumery questions there, just here 🙂

4 Comments

  1. Crystal

    Hi Anya,
    I’d love to hear your tips on botanical fixatives and creating more sillage in natural perfumery. Thanks!

    Reply
  2. Anya

    Hi Crystal:

    Sorry for my late reply, I was gardening, relaxing. For the botanical fixatives, I recommend you look into the sources we used in the Mystery of Musk project in 2010:
    Botanical Sources:

    Ambrette Seed
    Angelica Root
    (Ambrette seed and angelica root are the only botanicals that contain macrocyclic musk, like the musk deer.)
    Sandalwood
    Labdanum
    Vetiver
    Spikenard
    Oud
    Vanilla
    Musk Rose
    Black Currant
    Jasmine sambac
    Patchouli
    Cumin
    Black pepper
    Costus
    Seaweed
    Carrot Seed
    For increased sillage: use a bit of water in your perfumes, and use your experience to tell you what oils naturally have sillage: galbanum, kaffir lime, etc. Then, use them in your perfumes.

    Reply
    • Crystal

      Thanks so much, this is great! Looking forward to your upcoming book.

      Reply
  3. Fallah

    Hi Anya,

    A while back I bought some pre-diluted ambrette CO2, at 10% in alcohol, from a reputable (I think) supplier. I formulated a perfume with it, and then when I needed some more, I bought some undiluted from another place. The odor strength was so drastically different that I had to dilute it down almost to 1% to get the same effect. What do you think happened? Did the first one I had oxidize and lose its strength? Mis-diluted? Do they vary so much?

    Thanks

    Reply

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